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Mesa Minerals Limited (MAS)
is a publicly listed company on the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX).


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General Overview

About Mesa Minerals Limited

Mesa Minerals Limited (“Mesa”) is a world leader in hydrometallurgical process technology designed to facilitate the production of manganese electrolytic products and fertilizer products from low grade manganese dioxide ores and from solid wastes containing significant levels of manganese. The suite of products that are economically and environmentally viable using Mesa’s patented processes include:

  • Consistently high purity, low cost electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) suitable for use in the manufacture of both alkaline and lithium-ion batteries;
  • Consistently high purity, low cost electrolytic manganese metal (EMM) suitable for use in the manufacture of specialty steels, other specialty non-steel products and ferrites used in electronics;
  • Manganese rich micro nutrient fertilizer micro nutrient fertilizer (MNF); and
  • Fertilizer grade, granulated manganese sulfate granulated manganese sulfate (GMS).

Importantly, the use of Mesa’s highly efficient sulfur dioxide leach process, to generate manganese sulfate electrolyte from manganese oxide ores, will allow the use of much lower ore feed grades than could be tolerated in any roasting based process. (Roasting is currently used as a means of reducing manganese ores and thereby rendering them soluble in hot acid.) In times such as these when high grade ore feeds are difficult to acquire, and expensive if they can be sourced, a plant’s ability to utilise much lower cost low grade ore feeds by adopting the Mesa processes could well make the difference between forced closure and continued profitable operation.

Since their manganese extraction process is a hydrometallurgical one, as compared with the conventional pyrometallurgical roasting process employed today to extract manganese from oxide ores, users will derive additional important environmental advantages including:

  • A 50% reduction in energy consumed;
  • The total elimination of carbon dioxide emissions; and
  • The ability to eliminate virtually all particulate and metal ion emissions.

When Mesa’s patented MNF production process is adopted in conjunction with its sulfur dioxide leach process, an EMD or EMM plant’s tailings (ie, everything in the ore that does not end up in the electrolytic products) will be in a form suitable for the production of a valuable slow release micro nutrient fertilizer product, rather than in the very undesirable highly soluble form which results from roasting and requires expensive and problematic long term impoundment. The interplay of these two patented processes will provide an economic and environmentally sound basis for any new EMD or EMM plant based upon oxide ore feed, or the rejuvenation of old plants that otherwise are faced with closure. With the present strong demand for both manganese electrolytic products and fertilizers to meet strong demand for food production, having two valuable product revenue streams will greatly enhance any plant’s survival prospects.

Whether it be as a technology vendor or as a technology user, Mesa has before it the challenge to commercialise these technologies to meet the demands of today’s world for products that can truly claim to be ‘green’ in their production, their use and their ultimate disposal.

Prospects

Near Term

In the near term, Mesa’s future prospects will largely be determined by its ability to move its two manganese mining leases, Ant Hill and Sunday Hill located in the Pilbara district of Western Australia, into production in time to take advantage of the prevailing high ore prices. Mesa has formed a joint venture with Auvex Resources Limited to produce manganese metallurgical lump ore from these leases and to jointly sell their respective production interests into the South East Asian manganese alloy market.

The lump produced will be a medium grade, high iron product ideally suited alloy production and particularly so in those instances, where the alloy to be made or the blend of ore feeds to be consumed, is complementary with the high iron content of the Ant Hill and Sunday Hill lump ore.

Whilst moving their mining leases into production quickly is the key to ensuring good near term cash flow, finding a complementary purchaser for the ore is the key to maximising their value over time, because it is only by this means can they ensure that the available ores from these sites will continue to be desired by an end user during periods of lower prices.

Near to Medium Term

In the near to medium term, Mesa’s future prospects will also be determined by the success of its strategies to commercialize its patented process technologies by demonstrating them at production scale in Western Australia and offshore. With the advent of mining operations on its manganese mining leases, Mesa’s secondary processing priorities have focused up the utilization of low grade manganese oxide fines generated during the production of the exported manganese lump ore product.

In this regard, Mesa is actively seeking support for a 25,000tpa fertilizer grade granulated manganese sulfate (GMS) plant to be built on its Boodarie Industrial Estate general purpose lease at Port Hedland. The capital cost of such a plant is estimated at under A$20m and it would consume all of the fines make from the export lump or mining operation, plus some additional otherwise unsaleable low grade manganese fines and ores available in the Pilbara. Once producing a steady income stream, this plant could either be expanded and converted to electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) production, with micro nutrient fertiliser (MNF) as a co-product, or expanded to include EMD production, but retaining GMS as the co-product.

Simultaneously with the Boodarie GMS project, Mesa is continuing to work with potential partners in India and China who are seeking to employ its patented processes to utilize efficiently low grade manganese oxides ores in the production of EMD and electrolytic manganese metal (EMM). The most advanced of these projects is located at Halol in India’s Gujarat State where the Gujarat Mining Development Corporation and the project promotor Cube Mines & Metals Pvt Ltd are seeking to incorporate an EMD plant in their plans for utilizing the manganese contained in the waste dumps at the former Shivrajpur Mine in the Panchmahal District and, in due course, fresh ore from the recommencementof mining on that site.

Medium to Long Term

Looking further forward, Mesa’s future prospects for generating a substantive and long term cash flow stream are firmly rooted in the proliferation of its patented processes via technology licencing and production expansions. The probability of success in these endeavours will depend on both the market context for the products that the technology can facilitate (as discussed in the various ‘product market context’ pages included on this website) and the continuance of the global shifts:

  • From pyrometallurgical processes to hydrometallurgical processes as a more efficient means of extracting metals from ores;
  • Towards ‘greener’ products and processes; and, most importantly,
  • Towards maximising the use of ore bodies mined as a means of sustaining metal production and reducing its cost over the long term.

At Mesa they believe that these trends are irreversible and in fact must accelerate if the world is to support the demand for metals in the developing world. It is only with innovative, energy efficient and non-polluting extraction processes can this demand be met in a way that is not ultimately self defeating.

To ensure that Mesa can enhance its prospects for success in the longer term, the company will continue its research and development activities with a view to expanding its intellectual property assets in ways that support the global trends noted above.


Products

Electrolytic Manganese Dioxide

The first step in a conventional production flow sheet for converting manganese oxide ore to alkaline grade electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD), which is a high purity product that possesses the ‘recipe specific’ electrical characteristics desired by batterymakers, is a high temperature pyrometallurgical roast process, wherein the manganese ore is heated to between 800°C and 900°C to reduce it so that it can then be dissolved in hot sulfuric acid. This process has many drawbacks that will inhibit its future use including:

  • As the roasting process reduces all oxides present in the ore, EMD producers must compete with steel and chemical industry buyers for the highest grades of manganese oxide fines if they are to ameliorate the production and product quality problems caused by non-manganese metal ions in the sulfate electrolyte;
  • In today’s world, the steel industry alone can consume all of the high grade manganese oxide ores that are available leaving existing EMD plants, which are dependent on sourcing high grade ores, at risk of closure even in times such as these when the market for their EMD production is particularly strong;
  • The roasting process is highly energy inefficient with a conventional EMD plant requiring more than double the energy of a same size plant employing the Mesa modified sulfur dioxide leach technology described below; and
  • The roasting process is highly polluting, emitting high carbon dioxide loads to atmosphere, particulate pollution that can pollute the surrounding environment and very insidious metal ion pollution that can find its way into streams and aquifers, travelling large distances before reporting in drinking water or crops grown for human consumption.

Mesa has developed and patented an alternative hydrometallurgical route for extracting manganese from low-grade manganese oxide ores, or ore tailings, and converting this manganese into a very pure high quality electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) for use in alkaline and lithium-ion battery production. The following schematic process flowsheet entitled depicts the steps in the Mesa process for production of EMD that, with two important exceptions, are identical to the conventional process. The exceptions are in the manganese leach step and in the availability of the plant residues, or tailings, for manufacture of a multi-nutrient fertilizer (MNF).

Process Control

The main benefit of the hydrometallurgical route is the simplicity of the leach process and the ease of measuring the condition of the reaction to enable its control. Adding SO2 gas to an acidic slurry of fine ground manganese oxide ore at below 100°C is considerably easier to monitor and control than the pyrometallurgical route. Process control becomes an increasingly important factor when plants are sited in remote areas, closer to where their ore source, because constant high calibre technical supervision is sometimes more difficult to achieve.

The pyrometallurgical roasting and acid leach process is less reliable and potentially wasteful in that it is more difficult to control and will always produce some poorly reduced ore. The product from the reaction, which occurs between 800°C and 900°C, aided by the addition of coal and gas, then requires cooling to enable milling before its addition to the acid leach. Clearly this is not an energy efficient process.

Even when best conditions are assumed for the pyrometallurgical roast process, some manganese ore will remain in its oxidised form and will not release its manganese content in the acid leach step, resulting in that manganese oxide ore going to waste. In contrast, the Mesa sulfur dioxide leach is a hydrometallurgical route which does not depend on the valent state of the manganese in the ore feed and thus will always maximise the leaching of the manganese from the ore.

The roasting of a manganese ore, together with all of its mineral components other than manganese, enables these other components that would not normally leach in acid, to be converted to a form which makes them leachable in acid. (NB:This is not generally the case in the Mesa sulfur dioxide leach route.) This adds cost to the pyrometallurgical route in removing this increased contamination load, and, in many instances, in interruptions to production. Importantly, it can also result in lower product quality that will in turn lower a plant’s revenue potential.

Environmental Performance

Roasting is also not environmentally friendly as the off-gases of CO2 and CO from the roasting kiln have to be burnt to eradicate the CO component, forming more CO2 in the process before scrubbing to remove the dust carried from the kiln. This significant quantity of CO2 gas is then released, adding to the greenhouse gas load in the atmosphere.

By contrast, the off-gases from the Mesa sulfur dioxide leach are predominantly steam, nitrogen (present as a dilutant in the sulphur dioxide and being returned to the atmosphere) and unreacted SO2 gas. Importantly there is no dust. The unreacted SO2 gas is scrubbed using limestone or lime to meet environmental standards and recirculated. Logically, the operation needs to use efficiently the SO2 gas, and hence minimise any loss in the off-gases. This minimisation of SO2 gas loss will be readily manageable as part of the standard metallurgical operation procedures for operating an efficient process plant.

Product Quality

The Mesa sulfur dioxide leach process is highly selective for manganese in preference to other metals both because of its inherent chemistry and its ready controllability. As a consequence the loading of other metals in the electrolyte prior to purification is very low relative to the conventional roast method. In practice this has the effect of making the same electrolyte purification steps used in each process far more efficient in the Mesa leach case. EMD produced in Mesa’s demonstration plant was rated as superior in terms of minor element content and ideally suited for use as a feedstock to produce lithiated manganese dioxide for consumption in lithium ion batteries due to its exceedingly low iron levels.

EMD structure EMD is a complex composite of various crystals of manganese and oxygen that is produced through electrowinning. It is used primarily as the active constituent of alkaline batteries and increasingly as the feedstock for the cathodic material in lithium-ion batteries. The structure of EMD is highly disordered, but predominantly made up of the manganese dioxide crystal ramsdellite, depicted here, with the red balls signifying the oxygen atoms in the green manganese dioxide crystal lattice.

Cost Minimisation

The Mesa sulfur dioxide leach process was conceived to process efficiently the medium grade, high iron manganese oxide ore found on the company’s own mining leases located in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Subsequently, the concept has been refined to deal with grades of ore down to 25% Mn, whether these ores are of ferruginous or silicious origin, and even high tenor manganese wastes from the electrolytic zinc and nickle laterite industries. As such, it is a process that utilises low cost feeds that in many cases are otherwise unsaleable or are a ‘cost of production’ for their producers in that they have to be removed from their processes and impounded in tailings dams indefinitely.

This is clearly a far superior cost structure starting point than that of the conventional process for the production of high performance EMD’s which requires the highest grades of manganese oxide available. These high grade ores must be bought in competition with the steel and chemical industries, whose requirements and financial resources vastly overshadow those of the EMD producers, and as these higher grades of ore are usually mined at greater distances from the EMD plants than low grade alternatives, then higher freight and handling costs are often also incurred.

Resource Maximisation

Finally, there is a further very important difference between the two processes and this is in the chemical state of the plant residues or tailings. In the case of the conventional roast route, the tailings contain largely higher forms of oxides of the metals, which would quickly disperse into the watertable and streams, and are thus unsuitable for further processing into products for agricultural use as a fertilizer. These tailings must be impounded for the long term, and at significant cost, to ensure that the ‘readily available’ metal ions contained therein do not leach naturally into the watertable and migrate away from the plant site. (This migration is sometimes referred to as an EMD or EMM plant’s “manganese ion plume”).

By contrast, the Mesa sulfur dioxide leach preconditions the tailings and leaves them in a state that is ideally suitable for further processing into a valuable micro nutrient fertilizer product. This is a factor that not only maximises the profitable utilisation of the ores bought by an EMD producer, but also reduces plant costs by avoiding the need for long term tailings impoundment whilst simultaneously creating a second valuable revenue stream.

Electrolytic Manganese Metal

The Mesa sulfur dioxide leach process offers a producer of high purity electrolytic manganese metal (EMM), who wishes to use manganese oxide ore as the plant feedstock, all the same benefits that an EMD producer can derive, as are outlined at some length under the electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) page of this website. (Such is the similarity of the electrolyte specifications for these two production processes that it is reasonable to visualise one single electrolyte generation and purification circuit feeding electrolyte to both an EMD cellhouse and an EMM cellhouse, with only minor adjustments to the two feeds after purification has taken place.)

The advantages of the Mesa sulfur dioxide leach process relative to a conventional manganese oxide ore roasting process include:

  • An improvement in metal purity from the more common 99.5% or 99.7% standards to the less common 99.8% standard making the output of the plant more attractive to industries requiring high purity (eg, in the electronics industry where EMM is used as feedstock for the production of ferrites);
  • A very significant reduction in ore acquististion costs;
  • A 50% reduction in energy consumed;
  • The total elimination of carbon dioxide emissions;
  • The creation of a second fertilizer product from the plant tailings (ie, a cost of production transformed into a valuable revenue);
  • The ability to eliminate virtually all particulate and metal ion emissions; and
  • The elimination of hydrogen sulfide gas from the cell house improving occupational health and safety conditions.

In places where there is an abundance of manganese carbonate ores, such as in southern China, EMM and EMD tend to be made by dissolving the carbonate ore in sulfuric acid, rather than roast reduction followed by acid dissolution, as is the case for manganese oxide ores. These carbonate ores tend to be low grade and, where an alternative low grade manganese oxide ore is also available, producers could benefit by adopting the Mesa process. In doing this, they would be able to convert all plant tailings to a valuable fertilizer product. This can be a very significant advantage, as when manganese electrolytic products are produced from manganese carbonate ores, the tailings produced can be up to 5 times the volume of tailings produced when manganese oxide ores are used resulting in very significant land use and long term impoundment costs.

The combination of a second revenue stream, lower impoundment costs and vastly improved plant environmental performance makes the adoption of the Mesa leach approach inevitable where low grade oxide ores are also available. Even for existing plants, the low capital costs involved with retrofitting a Mesa sulfur dioxide leach circuit and the increased plant profits would mean a very quick payback period for the investment. Additionally, the manganese carbonate ores not used would then be available for manganese alloy production to meet the demands of the steel industry.

Micro Nutrient Fertilizer

Mesa’s patented sulfur dioxide leach process is highly efficient and could be used to extract a very high percentage of the manganese in any given oxide ore irrespective of that ore’s grade. However, there are operational advantages, cost benefits and revenue gains to be achieved by decreasing the manganese ion recovery via the leach and allowing the unrecovered manganese units to report to the plant tailings.

Attaining these advantages is possible because the Mesa sulfur dioxide leach process effectively ‘preconditions’ the tailings leaving the majority of the metal ions present in a form suitable for slow release into soil via organic leaching. The tailings from an EMD or EMM plant using their leaching process will contain various elements required for stimulating healthy plant growth, in ratios dependent largely on the composition of the feedstock ore. However, in all instances the tailings will be rich in manganese ions, an element that is particularly deficient in Australian and Indian soils in many areas used for agriculture, which is somewhat ironic given the amount of manganese mined in these two countries.

Thus the interplay of Mesa’s multi nutrient fertilizer (MNF) patent and its manganese leach patent can be used to advantage of both new and existing manganese electrolytic plants that are or can be fed with manganese oxide ores. (NB: The technology could also be employed by an EMD or EMM plant that currently uses manganese carbonate ore, but could switch to a low cost oxide feed, with the carbonate ore redirected profitably into manganese alloy production for the steel industry.) In practice, many manganese electrolytic plants could switch to a low grade ore feed located much closer, which would cost far less to buy and ship to the plant.

The capital cost of replacing a roast circuit with a leach circuit and the provision of a new MNF circuit would be readily repaid out of increased revenues and lower costs. Plants undertaking such a retro-fitting would be effectively rejuvenated and could look forward to decades of additional life irrespective of the urbanization that inevitably intensifies around them. An additional bonus may also be possible where the old tailings dams can be reclaimed and the land reused or sold off.

A typical composition of an MNF product derived from a ferruginous 25% manganese oxide, sourced from Mesa’s Ant Hill mining lease as feed for an EMD plant, would be as follows:

  • Mn 9.4%
  • Fe 16.5%
  • Ca 10.8%
  • S 8.3%

These elements can be adjusted by either changing the ore grade input to the process or adding say additional manganese in the form of MnSO4 rendering the final specification ideal for application say in the manganese deficient agricultural areas of Western Australia. Customizing the product by the addition of elements such as zinc, copper and molybdenum is also a relatively easy and cheap task that would be performed prior to final product preparation. In most instances, Mesa would expect that the specification of the micro nutrient fertilizer product for any given ore source could be tweaked if necessary to match the requirements of the local area agricultural soil deficiencies. Where this is not the case, or a plant’s MNF production exceeds local demand, the excess production could be readily exported to other markets, due to the high demand for such products.

The form of the final MNF product would also depend firstly on the local area demand and then on export demand if necessary. An EMD or EMM plant using Mesa’s leach and fertilizer patents could produce a granulated product by first dewatering the tailings stream and then spray drying it, before utilizing either the agglomeration method or the compaction method to produce a granular product. In these cases, Mesa would ship the product to fertilizer companies for further blending and custom retailing in 1 tonne bulk bags.

Alternatively, a suspension concentrate could be produced by the addition of reagents and any additional elements required, with the product consigned in 20 litre drums, or larger fluids containers where required, ready for dilution before spraying.

Whilst the main argument for a new EMD or EMM plant adopting Mesa’s leach and fertilizer patents, or an existing plant retro-fitting them, is an economic one in that a significant cost is converted to a significant revenue, the environmental argument for doing so is also strong. Tailings impoundments are inherently big ugly expanding facilities that generate opposition in the communities surrounding them, and when their contents are not largely benign, as is the case where conventional roasting of manganese oxides or acid dissolution of manganese carbonates occurs, then this only serves to further stimulate opposition to tailings emplacement facilities in the local community. Mesa believes that the environmental argument alone would justify the retrofitting of its technologies to several of the existing alkaline EMD plants that are sited adjacent to residential communities, with the economic benefits coming as a bonus.

Granulated Manganese Sulfate

Mesa’s patented sulfur dioxide leach process is highly efficient and could be used to extract a very high percentage of the manganese in any given oxide ore irrespective of that ore’s grade. This efficiency makes it ideal for the productions of a highly pure solution of manganese sulfate from which a fertilizer grade granulated manganese sulfate (GMS) product can be produced. Importantly, GMS could be produced as an interim product prior to expanding the plant to produce either electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) or electrolytic manganese metal (EMM), thus facilitating the financing of a new electrolytic plant by financing the later stage capital spend from GMS cash flows.

By utilizing the Mesa sulfur dioxide leach process, a manganese electrolytic plant, can continue to produce GMS as a co-product of EMD or EMM on a long term basis, as an alternative to micro nutrient fertilizer (MNF) production as the co-product. The choice of either GMS or MNF as a co-product will be predominantly driven by prevailing prices for these products at the time of the investment decision, local market demand and access to export markets, as the capital involved will be relatively similar in each case. A secondary but potentially important consideration will be the production of a benign silica tailing where the GMS route is chosen that will need to be disposed of compared with zero tailings make when the MNF route is chosen.

Existing manganese electrolytic plants that depend on manganese oxide ores could obtain the same benefits as a new plant, namely the ability to switch to a low grade ore feed located much closer that would cost far less and to create a second revenue stream by co-producing a fertilizer product, by replacing their current roast/acid dissolution circuits with a Mesa sulfur dioxide leach circuit. The capital cost of replacing a roast circuit with a leach circuit and the provision of a new GMS or MNF circuit would be readily repaid out of increased revenues and lower costs. Plants undertaking such a retro-fitting would be effectively rejuvenated and could look forward to decades of additional life irrespective of the urbanization that inevitably intensifies around them. An additional bonus may also be possible where the old tailings dams can be reclaimed and the land reused or sold off.

A typical composition of an GMS product derived from a ferruginous 25% manganese oxide, sourced from Mesa’s Ant Hill mining lease as feed for an EMD/GMS plant, would be a manganese sulphate monohydrate, containing:

  • Mn 32% minimum; and
  • S minimum 18%.
  • Production of GMS by this method has several advantages over the more commonly used methods:
  • the elimination of roasting and thus a reduction in energy usage;
  • the elimination of particulate and metalion pollution;
  • the elimination of carbon dioxide emmissions; and
  • the ability to utilize low cost manganese oxide ore as the plant feedstock.

The form of the final GMS product would also depend firstly on the local area demand and then on export demand if that is the chosen route.

Manganese Ore

Auvex Joint Venture

Mesa has concluded a Farmin and Joint Venture Agreement and a Sales Agency Heads of Agreement with Auvex Resources Limited (Auvex) under which Auvex will be the manager of a manganese ore production joint venture and Mesa will be the manager of a joint ore sales arrangement; roles that draw appropriately on the respective competencies of the two organisations.

The joint venture parties intend to mine the manganese resouces of Mesa’s Ant Hill and Sunday Hill mining leases, initially exporting a medium grade, high iron manganese metallurgical lump ore from Port Hedland to markets in South East Asia. The joint venture parties are targetting production and sale of approximately 200,000 tonnes of ore per annum with the following specification:

  • Mn 42%
  • Fe 10%
  • SiO2 <17%
  • Al2O3
  • P <0.1%
  • K
  • CaO
  • MgO

(NB: Further drilling work scheduled for mid 2008 may increase the annual tonnage target and expand on the targetted lump ore specification. However, their knowledge of the deposit is such that it is unlikely to change the grade targets for Mn and Fe.)

The mining operations undertaken to enable the production and sales of an export grade metallurgical lump ore product will also produce a low grade metallurgical ‘chip’ ore product that the joint venture partners will seek to beneficiate before export and a low grade fines product that will be reserved as feed for a fertilizer grade granulated manganese sulfate (GMS) plant that is proposed to be built at the Boodarie Industrial Estate in Port Hedland.

Ant Hill

Mesa’s Ant Hill mining lease contains a large resource of medium grade, high iron manganese that prior to 1968 yielded approximately 500,000 tonnes of manganese metalurgical grade lump ore at an average Mn content of 48.3%. (Mining activities at Ant Hill ceased with the opening of BHP’s Groote Eylandt manganese mine.) The deposit is located 360 km by road from Port Hedland as depicted in the accompanying map.

Metallurgical studies have demonstrated the suitability of the ore for use in the Mesa sulfur dioxide leach process. Mining and geological studies indicate that the resource is amenable to mining by small scale open cut quarry methods and where the ore mined was directed to a secondary processing end use, using Mesa’s patented processes, it would provide a long life feedstock supply. These studies also demonstrate that the mining of medium grade lump ore for export is synergistic with the mining and secondary processing locally of lower grades of ore, with each strategy supporting the other and maximising the resource utilization achieved.

The Ant Hill manganese deposits occur as a number of discrete podiform bodies of various sizes on the Ant Hill mesa. The mesa is a fault bounded elongate feature approximately 1.5km long and 400m wide with a maximum topographic relief of 50m. A prominent cap of strongly indurated manganese and iron forms the top of the mesa. Underlying the cap to a depth of some 20m is a sub-horizontal zone of varying manganese grade. Lithologies vary from silts and shales to massive hard manganese-rich rocks comprised essentially of manganese oxides. Surface mapping, as well as the presence of a number of small quarries left from past mining activity, indicates that only a small portion of the potential mineralisation at Ant Hill has been drill tested. A ‘reserve’ category tonnage has yet to be calculated for the Ant Hill mining lease to JORC standards, although work concluded to date indicates that this lease will yield further metallurgical grade lump ore suitable for export.

Two drilling programs, in 1992 and 1998, covered an area of 250m x 400m at the southern end of the mesa. The 1992 data was used to create a resource model which supported an estimated Indicated Resource of 1.42 million tonnes of 25% manganese at a 15% cut-off.

Subsequently in 1998, Mesa commissioned a delineation drilling programme and resource estimation over a high grade area of the above resource. The programme entailed drilling seventy four reverse circulation holes on a 20m x 20m grid. A comprehensive geochemical study was completed on the drill samples. The study utilised a domain model, grade modelling using inverse distance weighting and grade tonnage curves to estimate a Indicated Resource of 510,000 tonnes at 30% manganese at a 25% cut-off.

A permit is current for a third drilling programme, planned for mid 2008, that will target areas likely to yield early production tonnes. Further drilling will follow on a regular basis for the purpose of near term production scheduling, ungrading of resource definition and long term mine planning.

An application has been lodged with the Department of Industry & Resources seeking permission to recommence mining at Ant Hill in June 2008. The initial work will be restricted to clean up works around the old pits and stock pile areas plus the removal of bulk samples for metallurgical testing at laboratories in Australia and at potential customer production facilities. All test work is expected to be concluded by late 2008 with regular shipments planned to commence in early 2009, given that all necessary approvals have been obtained by then.

Sunday Hill

Mesa’s Sunday Hill mining lease, which is located close to Ant Hill, is also a remnant mesa formation that rises 20 to 30 metres above the surrounding plain and has moderate to gentle slopes. The mesa is largely devoid of trees and generally covered by spinifex. The surface consists of skeletal soils to outcrop with some scree slopes and areas covered by colluvium. The geology of Sunday Hill is very similar to that of Ant Hill.

Sunday Hill - Aerial view along North East escarpmentSunday Hill is an outlier of late Precambrian Manganese and Hamersley Group sediments and covers an area of 5 x 5 square kilometres. The sediments form a broad NW plunging syncline and overlie Fortescue Group banded iron and shale units.

On the NE side of Sunday Hill, there is a 1200 metre long outcrop of NW/SE striking ferruginous manganese at the unconformity of the Manganese Group and Fortescue Group sediments. The ferruginous manganese has a width that averages about 25 metres and varies from 20 to 70 metres. It is overlain by Pinjian Chert Breccia and ferruginous sandstone that has some thin pebbly bands (Coondoon Formation) The dips of the sediments that enclose the ferruginous manganese are 30 to 70 degrees to the southwest.

As is the case at Ant Hill, ‘reserve’ category tonnage has yet to be calculated for the Sunday Hill lease to JORC standards, although work conducted to date indicates this lease, like the Ant Hill lease, will yield manganese metallurgical lump ore suitable for export:

The two remnant mesas are part of the same geological formation and whilst some differences in ore type have been noted from past sample and drilling, their average grades would be expected to be very similar.

In 2001, Bryan Smith Geoservices Pty Ltd (consulting to Mesa) concluded that there was potential for 1.5 million tonnes of ferruginous manganese over the 1200m strike length of outcrops.

In July 2002, Mesa commissioned a gravity survey over the mesa identified 5 anomalies which could be related to surface expressions of manganese mineralisation and were deemed to warrant follow up by drilling.

In 2006, an initial JORC compliant inferred resource was reported for Sunday Hill of 4.7 million tonnes at an average grade of 18.4% manganese, and further geophysical and drilling work specified for the purpose of upgrading and extending the resource.

In 2007 a sub-audio magnetics survey was conducted over the mesa which added two further anomolies that were deemed worthy of follow up drilling.

In mid 2008, the joint venture partners have scheduled and permitted additional drilling at Sunday Hill intended to test all geophysical anomolies and improve the resource categorisation.


Price History

52 Week High Change from 52 Week High % Change from 52 Week High 52 Week Low Change from 52 Week Low % Change from 52 Week Low
${{quote["Year's High"]}} ${{(quote["Historic Close"] - quote["Year's High"]) | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{(((quote["Historic Close"] / quote["Year's High"]) - 1) * 100) | setDecimalCheckForNa}}% ${{quote["Year's Low"] | setDecimalCheckForNa}} ${{(quote["Historic Close"] - quote["Year's Low"])| setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{(((quote["Historic Close"] / quote["Year's Low"]) - 1) * 100) | setDecimalCheckForNa}}%
Date Open High Low Close Volume

Dividend Information

Dividend Yield Dividend Yield (5 Yr Avg) ISIN Stock Code (RIC) SEDOL Dividend Currency
{{ratios.Valuation.DivYield_CurTTM.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Valuation.YLD5YAVG.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{Dividends[0].ISIN}} {{Dividends[0].RIC}} {{Dividends[0].SEDOL}} {{Dividends[0].DividendCurrency != '' ? Dividends[0].DividendCurrency : '-'}}

Year CorpActID DPTD DivAnnDate DivExDate DivPayDate DTMD DivRate DRD DRPrice DTMD DTMD Frank%
{{item.DividendExDate == '00/01/1900' ? '-' : item.DividendExDate}} {{item.CorporateActionsID}} {{item.DividendPaymentTypeDescription}} {{item.DividendAnnoucementDate == '00/01/1900' ? '-' : item.DividendAnnoucementDate}} {{item.DividendExDate == '00/01/1900' ? '-' : item.DividendExDate}} {{item.DividendPayDate == '00/01/1900' ? '-' : item.DividendPayDate}} {{item.DividendTypeMarkerDescription}} {{item.DividendRate != '0' ? item.DividendRate : '-'}} {{item.DividendReinvestmentDeadline == '00/01/1900' ? '-' : item.DividendReinvestmentDeadline}} {{item.DividendReinvestmentPrice != '0' ? item.DividendReinvestmentPrice : '-'}} {{item.DividendTaxMarkerDescription != '' ? item.DividendTaxMarkerDescription : '-'}} {{item.DividendTaxRate != '0' ? item.DividendTaxRate :'-'}} {{item.FrankingPercent != '0' ? item.FrankingPercent : '-'}}

Share Statistics

  Revenue/Share Free Cash Flow Per Share Cash Flow Per Share Book Value Per Share Book Value(tangible) Per Share Cash Per Share
Most Recent Quarter - - - {{ratios['Per share data'].QBVPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].QTANBVPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].QCSHPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Most Recent Fiscal Year {{ratios['Per share data'].AREVPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - {{ratios['Per share data'].ACFSHR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].ABVPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].ATANBVPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].ACSHPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Trailing 12 Months {{ratios['Per share data'].TTMREVPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].TTMFCFSHR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].TTMCFSHR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - - -
  Dividend Per Share EPS Normalized EPS Basic Exluding Extraordinary Items EPS Including Extraordinary Items EPS Excluding Extraordinary Items EBITD Per Share
Most Recent Fiscal Year {{ratios['Per share data'].ADIVSHR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].AEPSNORM.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].ABEPSXCLXO.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].AEPSINCLXO.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].AEPSXCLXOR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} -
Trailing 12 Months {{ratios['Per share data'].TTMDIVSHR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - {{ratios['Per share data'].TTMBEPSXCL.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].TTMEPSINCX.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].TTMEPSXCLX.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Per share data'].TTMEBITDPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
5 Year Average {{ratios['Per share data'].ADIV5YAVG.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - - - - -
Avg Vol(3 month) Avg Vol(10 day) Shares Outstanding Float % Held by Insiders % Held by Institutions Shares Short Shares Ratio Short % of Float Shares Short(prior month)
{{ratios['Price and Volume'].VOL3MAVG.Value | checkForNa}} {{ratios['Price and Volume'].VOL10DAVG.Value | checkForNa}} - - - - - - - -
Common Shareholders Shares Outstanding Shares Issued Float
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Index Code Index name
{{item}} {{generalInfo.IndexMembership[item]}}
N/A N/A
Order Industry Type Code Mnemonic Reported
N/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
{{detail.Order | checkForNa}} {{detail.Description | checkForNa}} {{industry | checkForNa}} {{detail.Code | checkForNa}} {{detail.Mnemonic | checkForNa}}

Valuation Ratios

  P/E excluding extraordinary items P/E Normalized P/E Basic excluding extraordinary items P/E excluding extraordinary items high P/E excluding extraordinary items low P/E including extraordinary items
Most Recent Fiscal Year {{ratios.Valuation.APEEXCLXOR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Valuation.APENORM.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - - - -
TTM {{ratios.Valuation.PEEXCLXOR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - {{ratios.Valuation.PEBEXCLXOR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Valuation.TTMPEHIGH.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Valuation.TTMPELOW.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Valuation.PEINCLXOR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
  Price to Sales Price to Tangible Book Price to Free Cash Flow per Share Price to Cash Flow per Share Price to Book
Most Recent Fiscal Year {{ratios.Valuation.APR2REV.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Valuation.APR2TANBK.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Valuation.APRFCFPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - {{ratios.Valuation.APRICE2BK.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Trailing 12 Months {{ratios.Valuation.TTMPR2REV.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - {{ratios.Valuation.TTMPRFCFPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Valuation.TTMPRCFPS.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} -
Most Recent Quarter - {{ratios.Valuation.PR2TANBK.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - - {{ratios.Valuation.PRICE2BK.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Dividend Yield - 5 Year Average {{ratios.Valuation.YLD5YAVG.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Dividend Yield - indicated annual dividend divided by closing price {{ratios.Valuation.YIELD.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Current Dividend Yield - Common Stock Primary Issue, LTM {{ratios.Valuation.DivYield_CurTTM.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Net Debt, LFI {{ratios.Valuation.NetDebt_I.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Net Debt, LFY {{ratios.Valuation.NetDebt_A.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}

Financial Strength Ratios

  Current ratio Quick ratio LT debt/equity Total debt/total equity
Most Recent Quarter {{ratios['Financial strength'].QCURRATIO.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].QQUICKRATI.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].QLTD2EQ.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].QTOTD2EQ.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Most Recent Fiscal Year {{ratios['Financial strength'].ACURRATIO.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].AQUICKRATI.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].ALTD2EQ.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].ATOTD2EQ.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
  Payout ratio Current EV/Free Cash Flow Interest coverage Total debt/total equity
Most Recent Fiscal Year {{ratios['Financial strength'].APAYRATIO.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].EV2FCF_CurA.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].AINTCOV.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].ATOTD2EQ.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Trailing 12 Months {{ratios['Financial strength'].TTMPAYRAT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].EV2FCF_CurTTM.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].TTMINTCOV.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} -
Income Statement Revenue EBITD Earnings before taxes Net Income available to common Earnings before taxes Normalized Earnings per Share, Normalized, Excluding Extraordinary Items, Avg. Diluted Shares Outstanding
Most Recent Fiscal Year {{ratios['Income Statement'].AREV.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Income Statement'].AEBITD.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Income Statement'].AEBT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Income Statement'].ANIAC.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Income Statement'].AEBTNORM.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} -
Trailing 12 Months {{ratios['Income Statement'].TTMREV.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Income Statement'].TTMEBITD.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Income Statement'].TTMEBT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Income Statement'].TTMNIAC.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - {{ratios['Income Statement'].VDES_TTM.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
  Gross Margin Net Profit Margin % Operating Margin Pre Tax Margin Free Operating Cash Flow/Revenue
1st Historical Fiscal Year {{ratios.Margins.AGROSMGN.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Margins.ANPMGNPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Margins.AOPMGNPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Margins.APTMGNPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} -
Trailing 12 Months {{ratios.Margins.TTMGROSMGN.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Margins.TTMNPMGN.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Margins.TTMOPMGN.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Margins.TTMPTMGN.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Margins.Focf2Rev_TTM.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
5 Year Average {{ratios.Margins.GROSMGN5YR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Margins.MARGIN5YR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Margins.OPMGN5YR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Margins.PTMGN5YR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Margins.Focf2Rev_AAvg5.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Risk Ratio Current Ratio Quick Ratio Interest Coverage LT Debt/Equity Total Debt/Total equity
Most Recent Quarter {{ratios['Financial strength'].QCURRATIO.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].QQUICKRATI.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - {{ratios['Financial strength'].QLTD2EQ.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].QTOTD2EQ.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Most Recent Fiscal Year {{ratios['Financial strength'].ACURRATIO.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].AQUICKRATI.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].AINTCOV.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].ALTD2EQ.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Financial strength'].ATOTD2EQ.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Trailing 12 Months - - {{ratios['Financial strength'].TTMINTCOV.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - -

Management Effectiveness Ratios

Turnover Asset Inventory Receivables
Most Recent Fiscal Year {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].AASTTURN.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].AINVTURN.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].ARECTURN.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Trailing 12 Months {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].TTMASTTURN.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].TTMINVTURN.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].TTMRECTURN.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Return on Average Assets EBITD Equity Investment
Most Recent Fiscal Year {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].AROAPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].AROEPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].AROIPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Trailing 12 Months {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].TTMROAPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].TTMROEPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].TTMROIPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
5 Year Average {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].AROA5YAVG.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].AROE5YAVG.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].AROI5YRAVG.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Employees Net Income Revenue
Most Recent Fiscal Year {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].ANIPEREMP.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].AREVPEREMP.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
Trailing 12 Months {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].TTMNIPEREM.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios['Mgmt Effectiveness'].TTMREVPERE.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}

Growth Ratios

Growth Rates Revenue % EPS Dividend Revenue/Share Book Value Per Share Capital Spending Net Profit Margin
Most Recent Quarter 1 Year Ago {{ratios.Growth.REVCHNGYR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Growth.EPSCHNGYR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - - - - -
5 Years {{ratios.Growth.REVTRENDGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Growth.EPSTRENDGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - {{ratios.Growth.REVPS5YGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Growth.BVTRENDGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Growth.CSPTRENDGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Growth.NPMTRENDGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
3 Years {{ratios.Growth.REVGRPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Growth.EPSGRPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Growth.DIVGRPCT.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - - - -
TTM over TTM {{ratios.Growth.EPSTRENDGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Growth.TTMEPSCHG.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - - - - -
CAGR Free Operating Cash Flow Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation & Amortization Tangible Book Value Total Debt
5 Year CAGR {{ratios.Growth.FOCF_AYr5CAGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Growth.Ebitda_AYr5CAGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Growth.TanBV_AYr5CAGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{ratios.Growth.STLD_AYr5CAGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
5 Year Interim CAGR - {{ratios.Growth.Ebitda_TTMY5CAGR.Value | setDecimalCheckForNa}} - -

Forecast Ratios

Projected Sales ProjSalesH ProjSalesL ProjSalesNumOfEst ProjSalesPS
{{forecasts.ProjSales | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjSalesH | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjSalesL | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjSalesNumOfEst | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjSalesPS | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
ProjSalesQ ProjSalesQH ProjSalesQL ProjSalesQNumOfEst Price2ProjSales
{{forecasts.ProjSalesQ | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjSalesQH | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjSalesQL | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjSalesQNumOfEst | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.Price2ProjSales | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
ProjEPS ProjEPSHigh ProjEPSLow ProjEPSNumOfEst ProjEPSQ
{{forecasts.ProjEPS | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjEPSH | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjEPSL | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjEPSNumOfEst | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjEPSQ | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
ProjEPSQH ProjEPSQL ProjEPSQNumOfEst ProjPE ProjLTGrowthRate
{{forecasts.ProjEPSQH | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjEPSQL | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjEPSQNumOfEst | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjPE | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjLTGrowthRate | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
TargetPrice EPSActual EPSPrev EPSSurprise EPSSurprisePrc
{{forecasts.TargetPrice | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.EPSActual | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.EPSPrev | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.EPSSurprise | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.EPSSurprisePrc | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
EPSActualQ EPSPrevQ EPSSurpriseQ EPSSurpriseQPrc
{{forecasts.EPSActualQ | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.EPSPrevQ | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.EPSSurpriseQ | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.EPSSurpriseQPrc | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
ProjProfit ProjProfitH ProjProfitL ProjProfitNumOfEst
{{forecasts.ProjProfit | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjProfitH | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjProfitL | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjProfitNumOfEst | setDecimalCheckForNa}}
ProjDPS ProjDPSH ProjDPSL ProjDPSNumOfEst
{{forecasts.ProjDPS | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjDPSH | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjDPSL | setDecimalCheckForNa}} {{forecasts.ProjDPSNumOfEst | setDecimalCheckForNa}}

Financial Reports

Financial Summary

Last Updated: {{generalInfo.TextInfo['Financial Summary'].LastUpdated}}

{{generalInfo.TextInfo['Financial Summary'].Value && generalInfo.TextInfo['Financial Summary'].Value != ''? generalInfo.TextInfo['Financial Summary'].Value: 'No Financial Summary Found.'}}


Accounting Notes
Fiscal Year Ends Most Recent Quarter Transfer agent Auditor Shariah Compliant

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-

- - {{generalInfo.Auditor && generalInfo.Auditor != ''? generalInfo.Auditor : '-'}}
Fiscal Period
Period End Date:
Period Length
Ratios Value
Analyst Footnotes

Last Updated: {{generalInfo.TextInfo['Analyst Footnotes'].LastUpdated}}

{{generalInfo.TextInfo['Analyst Footnotes'].Value && generalInfo.TextInfo['Analyst Footnotes'].Value != '' ? generalInfo.TextInfo['Analyst Footnotes'].Value : 'No Analyst Footnotes Found.'}}



Directors, Officers & Company Executives

Start Date End Date
{{personobject.PersonInformation.Name.Info| getDirectorFullNameIncludingPrefix}}
{{persontitlesobject.Value}}, {{persontitles.Start.Day}}-{{persontitles.Start.Month}}-{{persontitles.Start.Year}} {{persontitles.End.Day}}-{{persontitles.End.Month}}-{{persontitles.End.Year}}
No Directors, Officers & Company Executives Information Found.

Recommendation Statistics

No Recommendation Statistics

Recommendation Statistics
Recommendation Number Of Analysts
{{stats.Recommendation}} {{stats.NumberOfAnalysts}}
I/B/E/S Mean
{{verdict[meanmarker]}} {{analystvotes}} Analysts Mean recommendation from all analysts covering the company on a standardized 5-point scale.
  • Sell
  • Reduce
  • Hold
  • Buy
  • Strong Buy

Past Broker Recommendations

No Past Recommendations

Past Broker Recommendations
  Strong Buy Buy Hold Underperform Sell Total
{{snapshots.Age === 1 ? "1 Week Ago" : (snapshots.Age === 2 ? "30 Days Ago" : (snapshots.Age === 3 ? "60 Days Ago" : (snapshots.Age === 4 ? "90 Days Ago" : "")))}} {{snapshots.Statistics[0].NumberOfAnalysts}} {{snapshots.Statistics[1].NumberOfAnalysts}} {{snapshots.Statistics[2].NumberOfAnalysts}} {{snapshots.Statistics[3].NumberOfAnalysts}} {{snapshots.Statistics[4].NumberOfAnalysts}} {{snapshots.NumberOfRecommendations}}

Target Price

No Target Price

Target Price
Mean {{priceTarget.Mean}}
High {{priceTarget.High}}
Low {{priceTarget.Low}}
Median {{priceTarget.Median}}
Standard Devitation {{priceTarget.StandardDeviation}}
Number Of Estimates {{priceTarget.NumberOfEstimates}}

Videos

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Contact Info

Mesa Minerals Limited

1 Sleat Road
Applecross, WA
Australia, 6153

Phone: +61 8 9329 3750
Fax: +61 8 9329 3751
Website: http://www.mesaminerals.com.au

Click here to view the interactive map
Mesa Minerals Limited Google Map
Mesa Minerals Limited Google Map

Share Registry

Computershare Investor Services Pty Limited - Click here to view share registry profile

Phone: +61 3 9415 5000
Fax: +61 3 9473 2500
Email: investor.relations@computershare.com.au
Website: http://www.computershare.com/

452 Johnston Street
Abbotsford, VIC
AU Australia, 3067


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